It’s time to sharpen up

Iron sharpeneth iron;

so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.

Prov. 27:17

We use steel to sharpen steel,

and we blend with friends to sharpen each another.

MacDonald reminds us:

In the days of family hospitality and feasting together

before the controls and fake science of tyrants

There was a common scene of the host at a table sharpening

the carving knife by drawing each side of the cutting edge

against a hardened steel rod with fine ridges.

Preparing to carve the savory meats of communion fellowship

Just as the action of iron against iron sharpens,

so the interchange of ideas among people makes us more acute

in our thinking.

Sharing each other’s opinions gives a helpful breadth of view.

Asking questions sharpens wits.

Friendly intercommunication hones the personality

As by friction, one iron instrument is sharpened and polished

by contact with another, so we may be a help to each other

by interesting and profitable intercourse and exchange of thought.

A recluse is always a very one-sided individual.

We are blessed by fellowship mingling

We learn to understand others needs and others sorrows,

We find gain by welcoming in others.

We need those who are superior to our own knowledge.

Those who are deeper in their virtues and character, then ours.

Fellowship is is precious edge sharpening of one with another

and this is increasingly sweet as our days grow darker.

We’re not designed for solitude, but for society.

As one has written:

It is only as a social being that our powers and affections

are fully expanded.

Iron sharpens iron.

Steel, whetted against a knife, sharpens the edge.

So in the collision of different minds each whets the edge of the other.

We owe some of the most valuable discoveries of science

to this active reciprocity.

In the sympathies of friendship, when the mind is dull and

the countenance overcast, a word from a friend renews

blunted energy and exhilarates the countenance.

In our Creeds this is called “the communion of saints”

This is the believers privilege

This is the bond of brotherhood.

We should never walk alone,

Two are better then one

Where two or three are gathered together Jesus comes

He’s always knocking

So sharpen His iron by godly communication.

Walk together in mutual concern for each other’s infirmities,

Walk together in mutual concern for each other’s trials,

Walk together in mutual concern for each other’s temptations.

We build integrity of character through scrupulous honesty

in dealings with each other.

Avoidance is our bane

Loners care only for themselves and they spit on the common good.

Fools care nothing for thoughtful discourse;

all they do is run off at the mouth.

When wickedness arrives, shame’s not far behind;

contempt for life is contemptible.

Many words rush along like rivers in flood,

but deep wisdom flows up from artesian springs. …

Proverbs 18:1-4 MSG

Good friends deep in godly character who walk with Jesus and are

following God’s Spirit are partners of great importance.

Phillips notes:

We learn from one another; we take character and color from one another.

Our character eventually shows in our faces.

Our skills are honed in a hard process of friction.

We need to run the gauntlet of a two eagle-eyed edge sharpening

We need the techniques of objective testings.

Iron sharpens iron, complaints aren’t bad.

But Complaints mean work!

Allowances have to be made; we need to be fussy.

We need to perceive our flaws to have them eliminated.

Iron sharpens iron.

We need every kind of sharpening

We need exacting discipline

We need to develop our skills

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s